Posted in On My Mind Meditations

Living in Awe; Living Praise

“This is my story, this is my song. Praising my Savior all the day long.” -from the hymn, Blessed Assurance, by Fanny Crosby

I’ve mentioned before that of all kinds of prayer, praise most often perplexes me. When I determine to dedicate a part of my prayer time to praise, it often feels more contrived than sincere, though my heart is sincerely full of praise, awe, and wonder at the incomprehensible greatness of our God. I feel I praise Him best by praying the songs of David as I read my Bible or by singing worship songs at church or along with the radio in my car. Those are good things to do, but I want to learn to give God more. It’s kind of like the difference between buying a greeting card with just the right words or writing the sentiment yourself. The words on the card may perfectly express what’s in my heart, but the message would be more meaningful if I could give my own words.

So often, though, I feel my attempts fall short of what’s in my heart. When I pray, “Lord, You know all things,” I’m reciting a fact, not offering praise. How does one find words worthy of a praise offering to God? How does one dig so deep?

I’ve been thinking on this a lot this week, and I have a few ideas:

1. Praise begins with noticing. We need to ask God to make us aware of His work in our world, all around us everywhere. As we learn to see what He is doing, His work will inspire us to live in awe of Him. Talking to Him about the things we notice He is doing, things only He can do, is offering praise.

Notice the hair on the plant in the picture above, for example. God’s attention to detail is amazing! And those little hairs that we rarely notice have a job to do, helping to keep the plant healthy. Our God is incredibly detail-oriented, providing for the needs of everything He creates. Noticing this leads us to praise.

2. Praise is born of passion and personal experience. The worship songs we sing and the Psalms that resonate most deeply are the ones we can relate to personally; we recognize the truth of the words because we’ve experienced their truth for ourselves. Therefore, we can draw on our past experiences and current circumstances, proclaiming God’s work in them, in order to offer our own praise.

For example, instead of praying, “Lord, You know all things,” I can pray about something specific I know He knows: “Lord, You know how I feel about this situation. Someone is treating me unfairly, yet You know her heart and her motivations as well as mine. You love both of us and want what’s best for us. You are able to bring resolution to this situation. Help us both to see what we need to about the other, so we can understand each other and get along.” This prayer is a request, but it’s a request full of sincere praise, recognizing God’s work in our lives and offering trust, one of the greatest forms of praise.

Another example: “Lord, I am feeling pressed for time – so many demands on my life! But You are the very Creator of time. When Joshua needed more time to win a battle, You made the sun stand still for him! Because I know You are able to do that, I know You have given me all the time I need as well. I will trust You to guide me in using this resource wisely because I know You love me and want me to accomplish Your good purpose for my life, also a gift from You. All of this world’s resources – even time – are Yours. You give Your children everything they need.”

To praise God sincerely, we don’t have to sit down for this purpose and struggle to find words to say. Instead we live our praise, noticing God at work as we go about our day, giving Him credit and naming His attributes in action. As Fanny Crosby proclaimed, our stories give Him praise; they praise Him throughout every day.

Father, please help us to live aware of Your Presence and work in our lives. We want to notice, so we can proclaim praise! You are worthy and we love You. Thank You, Lord. Amen.