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How Do We Pray?

The Conversation BeginsWelcome to the fifth installment of The Conversation Begins, my 31+ non-consecutive-day series on prayer. (If you missed the first four posts, you can click here and scroll down to read through them. The oldest posts will be at the bottom of the page.)

Today I want to talk about how. How do we pray?

We simply talk to God.

God doesn’t make prayer complicated; He loves us and He wants to hear our voices. He also wants us to learn to listen for His, but that’s a subject for another post—or two—or more. Learning to recognize God’s voice is a skill to develop over the course of a lifetime, perhaps the most worthwhile skill we can develop in the time we have on Earth.

When Jesus’ disciples asked Him to teach them to pray, He didn’t tell them to bow their heads and close their eyes, to kneel or lie prostrate. He simply gave them words. We call these, The Lord’s Prayer, of course, and they model prayer perfectly! (Of course.) Many books and sermons have been written on this prayer, so I’m not going to analyze it here except to note that this prayer acknowledges God’s Fatherhood, sovereignty, and holiness, surrenders our will to God’s, asks God to meet needs, asks forgiveness and forgives others, seeks protection from temptation and evil, and ends in worship of our always-worthy God. These are elements of prayer we can strive to cover in our conversations with Him every day.

But we don’t have to cover them all every time we pray. There are a lot of helpful formulas out there that we can use as tools for prayer, but please remember, they are tools—not rules. When you learn about a friend’s tragedy, make that the focus of your prayer. If a conflict arises or a financial need, talk to God about it right away. If you’re fighting temptation or catch yourself in a sin, tell God what’s going on, confess your wrongs, ask Him to help you choose right or to make things right. We don’t have to focus on every aspect of prayer every time we pray. Instead we have many conversations with God covering different subjects throughout each day.

How We PrayAnd we don’t have to wait until we can kneel or close our eyes or get to church to pray. If the clock tells you it’s time for your dad’s surgery or your son’s test while you’re sitting in a meeting, think a prayer right where you are. Kneeling, bowing, and closing our eyes can help us to focus or remind us of our position before God. Praying at church allows us to be heard with other believers who are all talking together to God about the same thing. It’s important to pray in these ways sometimes, but they aren’t essential every time we pray.

There is one how that is essential to every prayer, though. This concerns our attitude. Whether we’re approaching God on our knees or while driving in the car, we need to approach Him with respect, humility, and a sincere heart. If we don’t believe He is listening to us, that He loves us, that He is able to keep His promises, and that His plans are perfect whether we understand them or not, our prayers will be hindered.

Suddenly I’m remembering the climactic scene from Gone with the Wind where Scarlett is ill. She has just suffered a miscarriage after falling down the stairs. She’s been crying out for Rhett, but no one has heard her. When someone finally does, when she finally has the opportunity to ask for him—something he’s desperately waiting for—she says, “Oh, what’s the use.” And that’s the end of the relationship. If Scarlett had only believed that Rhett would come if she called, he would have, and the story could have ended happily.

That said, our God will never give up on us like Rhett gave up on Scarlett, but He will wait until we call on Him . . . in faith . . . with the right attitude. Desperate for more of Him in every area of life, eager to see His Kingdom come and His Will done, that is how we pray.

Father, thank You for making it so easy to come to You. Thank you for encouraging us to do so. Thank You for waiting patiently. You are God, and there is no other. We need more of You. Amen.


 

Today I’m sharing this post at the Thought-Provoking Thursday Link-up. Click here to see what other posts are being shared there!

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Praying Our Way through Fear

Not So Evil Clown

I can almost look at this picture without being terrified.

October. The month when people tend to celebrate all things scary. I don’t take it too seriously. My husband and I don’t decorate, but I don’t mind if the neighbors do. Bats, cats, pumpkins, skeletons, evil clowns . . . wait . . . no, no, no! Our neighbor across the street has actually plastered a clown face three times the size of his front door to the front of his house – the house that is facing mine! (This morning, I’m kind of hoping that the storm melted it down. Or does that only work for witches?) Clowns are fearsome things.

So I have a new Parachute Prayer today. When we see things that frighten us, let’s pray. Let’s let these fearsome things remind us to ask God for courage and for protection – for ourselves, for our families, from evils seen and unseen. Then let’s thank God for using these to remind us He is there. He is with us. And He is bigger than anything!

Father, thank You for watching over us. Thank You for Your presence, for Your protection, and for the courage that comes from knowing You are here. We love You, Lord! Amen.


You can find more Parachute Prayers in my book about them. Click here to order from Amazon.

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We Need Him; O We Need Him

I woke up with a song in my head today. It’s one I haven’t heard in years, so I have no idea where it came from just out of the blue like this. Well, I do have some idea, and I’m thankful. It’s been playing over and over again all day, like a comforting lullaby in the midst of a tumultuous week. God knew I needed this—something I didn’t even know I needed myself. He is so good to provide.

The song? I Need Thee Every Hour. Raise your hand if you know it! If you don’t, click here to listen on YouTube. Here are the words (written by Annie S. Hawks in 1872):

Anytime Anything AnywhereI need Thee ev’ry hour,
Most gracious Lord;
No tender voice like Thine
Can peace afford.

I need Thee ev’ry hour;
Stay Thou Nearby.
Temptations lose their pow’r
When Thou art nigh.

I need Thee ev’ry hour,
In joy or pain;
Come quickly and abide,
Or life is vain.

I need Thee ev’ry hour,
Most Holy One.
O make me Thine indeed,
Thou blessed Son!

I need Thee;
O I need Thee!
Ev’ry hour I need Thee!
O bless me now, my Savior;
I come to Thee!

It occurs to me that this song answers the next two prayer questions: When can we pray? and Why do we pray?

When? Anytime. Any hour. Every hour. I hope you’re beginning to detect a theme as this series continues. Who can pray? Anyone. Where can we pray? Anywhere. What can we pray about? (I haven’t answered that one yet, but I know you can predict my answer—anything!) Our amazing God is available 24/7 to hear any of our voices talking to Him about anything, anywhere. He loves us that much!

And, not only is He willing, but He’s able to accomplish His Will. That tumultuous week I mentioned earlier? Yesterday I realized that though I’m willing to do a lot, I am not able. I have limits. So frustrating! I wish I could do all I want to do, but I must pick and choose and learn to prioritize carefully. My resources of strength and time, among others, are finite. God’s resources, however, are not. He wants to be available to talk with us anytime we want to talk with Him, and so He is available to talk with us anytime we want to talk with Him. We pray to an infinitely capable God.

The Conversation BeginsWhy do we pray? Because we need Him. We are utterly dependent on Him for every little thing. This reminds me of hearing my children stop what they were doing when they were little to look around or yell to get a response—even if I was sitting right there, just to reassure themselves that I was still hanging around. They needed me; they wanted to know that I was close. And I made sure I was—or that someone else was in my place when necessary—because I love them so much.

Isn’t it good to know God loves us and He’s good?! Being dependent, we’d be miserable if He weren’t. He is, though, and so we can talk to Him to find reassurance that He is there, when we need to enjoy His peace, when we’re fighting temptation, when we’re enjoying something and want to share the experience with Him, when we’re hurting and need wisdom, comfort, or strength, when we need to remember who we are or Whose we are—or Who He Is, and when we want His blessing on our life.

Huh? It’s beginning to look like the why is the when. Like I told you last week, the answers to these questions tend to get all tangled up. That’s okay, so long as we’re grasping the truth about prayer. Because God loves us, any of us can talk with Him about anything, anytime, anywhere. We can do so with confidence that He will respond in the perfect way at just the right time to bring glory to His name and good to us.

Better yet, as we grow to understand this in ever-deepening ways, our reasons for praying will grow, too. We’ll pray not only because we need Him but also because we love Him, we truly enjoy knowing He’s around, and we want to touch Him the only way we can—through prayer.

Father, thank You for touching me with a song today. Please touch my friends who are reading this as well. Your love and Your provision amaze me on days like today. Help me to pay more attention more often; I believe You do something to amaze me every day! Thank You for being my Father, my friend, my confidant, my counselor, my savior, my Lord, my teacher, my king. Thank You for hearing when I pray. Amen.

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Grace: The Stuff of Which Priceless Pearls are Made

Grace is The Stuff“Great peace have those who love your law, and nothing can make them stumble. I wait for your salvation, Lord, and I follow your commands.”Psalm 119:165-166

As I continue to study the topic of grace in my weekly Bible study group, I’ve been presented with many examples of people trying to find the grace to forgive the big stuff—the seemingly unforgivable, usually one-time, wrongs. At the same time, I’m trying to figure out how to come up with the grace to forgive little irritants—recurring annoyances that I must encounter again and again. Sometimes we are bound to people or circumstances that cause us much stress. How do we respond with grace?

My husband’s and my current irritant is an oppressive property manager. Before signing our lease, we read it carefully and asked many questions about everything that concerned us. Once we were sure we understood what we were getting into, we signed. This was about two weeks before we actually moved in. When we arrived in town and went to pick up our keys, however, the property manager presented us with one more paper to sign. This paper had all the deal breakers on it. Had he been up front with us, we never would have signed the lease. Yet our choice at that point, he made clear, was to sign and proceed on his terms or refuse to sign, forfeit our security deposit, six weeks rent, and non-refundable pet fee, and find ourselves without a home.

We signed under duress.

Most of the time it is okay. We love the house. But once or twice a month we have to deal with property-manager-related irritations. If he would leave us alone, we’d happily live here for three or four years and prove to be among the best tenants ever. As it is, once our lease is up, he’ll probably be looking for someone else to live in this house. Those last minute additions to our lease are just. that. annoying.

When I think of this situation, I pray for grace. Lots of grace! Here is what God is helping me to understand:

Irritants like our property manager are like the grains of sand that get into an oyster’s shell. The sand irritates the delicate oyster, but there’s nothing the oyster can do to get the sand out of the shell. Instead, the oyster produces some kind of secretion to coat the sand and ease the pain. Every time the sand irritates, the oyster adds another layer until a pearl is formed. Naturally, the greater irritations produce the largest pearls.

This is grace. When I feel irritation building up inside of me, I ask God to help me wrap it in grace. The grace doesn’t come from inside of me, though. I must go to God for what I need. He calms me down and comforts me. A pearl is born. If the irritation won’t go away, I must go to God again and again. The pearl grows every time I do. It occurs to me that this process works, over time, whether I’m dealing with a recurring, little irritation or trying to forgive a huge, unforgivable-in-my-own-strength sin. In either case, when I feel pain, I go to God and ask for more of His grace.

I saw this in action this morning as I read through Psalm 119. I’ve always seen this Psalm as a tribute to God’s Wisdom, praise for His Word—for His Law. This morning, though, I noticed there are actually two recurrent, almost parallel, themes. Along with expressing his devotion to God’s Law, the psalmist is pleading for salvation, deliverance, and freedom from oppression. This man was dealing with a serious irritant. Yet he responded by declaring his devotion to God, his loyalty to God’s law, his love for God’s Word as he asked for relief.

We can do this, too. No earthly oppressor has any kind of ultimate authority over us. We are members of God’s Kingdom. In His perfect timing, He will fight for us. He will set us free. When we look at any annoying, aggravating, or troubling situation from that perspective, the irritant seems to shrink. In fact, we can almost laugh at some; our God is just. that. BIG!

Paul wrote about this when he told the Corinthians about his thorn. We don’t know what this thorn was, but it irritated Paul. Three times, he asked God to take it away, but God refused. His reply to Paul was “My grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness” (2 Corinthians 12:9). This is a challenging passage, but I think I’m starting to get it now. God’s grace is the stuff we ask for when we need comfort from the pain of life’s thorns. As the grace builds up, beautiful pearls are born and grow for the glory of God’s name.

In a future post, I’ll write a little more about how these pearls bring glory to God’s name. In the meantime, I’m still calling on God for grace in irritating situations.

  • What are you asking God to take away or free you from?
  • How can you remind yourself to go to God for grace when something irritates?
  • How has He comforted you in troubling circumstances that you have no immediate power to change?

Father, thorns are ugly and painful, yet sometimes we choose to endure the pain and complain. Please remind us that You have all the grace we need for any situation. We only have to come to you. Please comfort us until You choose to set us free. Create a beautiful pearl in our lives for all the world to see. Thank You, Lord, for grace. Amen.

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Where Can We Pray?

The Conversation BeginsJust in case you haven’t figured it out yet, I’m starting this 31+ non-consecutive-day prayer series by answering the five W’s and H: Who, What, Where, Why, When, and How—not necessarily in that order, of course. I can’t be too predictable. So far I’ve written about what prayer is and who can pray. I’ve also touched on why and how we pray because it all kind of goes together. That’s okay. Repetition reinforces learning no matter our age.

Today I want to look at the question, “Where can we pray?”

Anywhere!!! Prayer is communicating with God. God is everywhere. Therefore, we can pray anywhere.

We don’t have to wait until we go to church or kneel beside our beds or sit down for a meal. If you feel grateful for something God is doing in your life, thank Him where you are. If you see an accident on the highway, pray for the victims as you drive past the scene. If you receive an e-mail notice with a prayer request, pray over it as you read. This kind of praying is the topic of my book, Parachute Prayer. I invite you to read it for many more prayer prompts like these.

In the meantime, let me throw out a few more ideas regarding where we can pray. These are for when we’re craving times of deeper, more focused prayer:

  • My personal favorite place to pray is in my journal. When I pick up my pen and start writing in that book, it doesn’t matter where I’m seated physically—my mind is focused on God as I’m writing. This doesn’t work for everyone; God has wired us all a little bit differently when it comes to how we concentrate best. My journal just happens to work best for me.
  • Hiding in the closet is another favorite of mine. Until recently, I thought this was unique—maybe strange. It’s not. It’s actually a pretty common mom thing. For some inexplicable reason, a closed closet seems to be an effective kid-free zone. That makes it Mom’s Sacred Space. Maybe there’s just something more personal about talking to God while seated . . . or lying . . . or crying in a small, enclosed place. (Just be sure your kids know where to find you if they need you. We wouldn’t want them to think that you abandoned them.) If there’s no room for you in your closet, try the Susannah Wesley approach and pull your apron over your head. This amazing woman taught her kids to respect this signal that she was taking a time-out for prayer. The concept is the same.
  • One church in our community has developed a prayer trail—a place where people can go to pray as they walk the carefully maintained path. I also know of people who simply pray for their neighborhoods as they walk through them. Studies have proven that we think better when we’re in motion. I’ve experienced this as some of my favorite writing ideas have come to me during long runs. God’s Spirit can also use the opportunity we provide by walking to help us remember things for which we want to pray. I do think our intent matters, though. God may take our prayers less seriously if we’re thinking, “I’m running, so I may as well pray,” rather than if we deliberately go on a walk because we want to pray. Let me clarify just a bit. If I’m running, and God brings a prayer concern to mind, I can pray while I’m running. That’s a Parachute Prayer. It’s a good thing. God gets my attention, and I respond to Him. But if I know God is calling me to a more focused time of prayer and I say, “Sure, God. But how about letting me accomplish two things at once? Let’s talk while I run,” my need for real communion with God probably won’t be met. God will patiently wait until I choose to set my heart wholly on Him.
  • I also like to pray while I’m driving. Sometimes if I have a ways to go, I’ll turn off the radio and have a talk with God. If you choose to give this a try, please remember not to close your eyes. Keep them on the road. Turning off the radio demonstrates an intentional decision to set our hearts on God and pray.
  • One final idea: we can pray in bed in the middle of the night. Sometimes this one really is more of an “I’m awake, God, so I may as well pray” kind of thing. But I don’t think He minds under these circumstances. Sometimes He wakes us up to talk to Him, putting specific concerns in our hearts. Other times He listens to whatever we have to say then helps us fall back to sleep—not unlike a parent who helps a child who wakes in the night.

We really can pray anywhere! God loves it when we choose to set our minds and hearts on Him.

Where do you like to pray?

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Book Review: “The Methuselah Project”

The Methuselah ProjectThe Methuselah Project by Rick Barry was a surprisingly fun find. Barry has combined historical fiction, science fiction, action adventure, and romance to create one curiosity-grabbing story. Though highly unlikely, Barry is convincing. He leaves the reader believing it could have happened that way.

The story begins in 1943 in the skies over the Third Reich during WWII. When American pilot Roger Greene is taken prisoner, his captors use him as a test subject in an experiment that changes his physiology. Seventy years later is still a captive, and he hasn’t aged. When he finally escapes, it’s into a world full of technology and lingo he doesn’t understand. Greene must convince someone that his story is true before the people who imprisoned him catch up to terminate their experiment.

At the same time (in 2015), Katherine Mueller, a young woman raised by her uncle after her parents’ deaths, is in training to rise in the ranks of a secret society called the Heritage Organization. Her uncle has been grooming her for this most of her life, but, while she wants to please him, she also longs to be free of his control. He doesn’t approve of her career and won’t even let her choose her own dates. When the organization calls on Katherine to participate in a field assignment while her uncle is out of the country, all that Katherine knows of her world must change.

I enjoyed reading this book and recommend it to fans of WWII fiction and modern day suspense. Kregel Publications sent me a complimentary copy of The Methuselah Project in exchange for this review.

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Surprise Finds to Go with Yesterday’s Post on Prayer

Words Aptly SpokenI’m so excited! I just love it when this happens. This morning during my quiet time, I came to a passage of Scripture that illustrated yesterday’s post so perfectly. Later, while reading another book, I came across another thought that did the same. Coincidences like this just have to be shared!

First, the Scripture passage:

“‘Because he loves me,’ says the Lord, ‘I will rescue him; I will protect him, for he acknowledges my name. He will call on me, and I will answer him; I will be with him in trouble, I will deliver him and honor him. With long life I will satisfy him and show him my salvation.'”Psalm 91:14-16

The Bible doesn’t name the author of this particular Psalm, but he had touched God’s heart. God saw that this person loved Him and wasn’t afraid to acknowledge God’s name. God responded by blessing him with rescue, protection, answered prayer, His presence, deliverance, honor, long life, and salvation. God has different blessings for different people; He knows best what we need. But when our prayers come from a loving and sincere heart, God takes notice and responds.

Surprise FindsSecond, the quote from the book:

“Times with your tween daughter can be bonding times that help you focus on your relationship and convey the message that you are excited your daughter is growing up.” -An Arp Adage from She’s Almost a Teenager by Peter and Heather Larson and David and Claudia Arp, p. 16

What does a parenting insight have to do with prayer? When I read this quote, I couldn’t help but rewrite it: Times with God can be bonding times that help us focus on our relationship. They give Him the opportunity to convey the message that He is excited that we are growing up.

Prayer is so much more than talking to God about what we want and what we’d like to see Him do in our world. Prayer is enjoying an ever-deepening relationship with our loving God.


 

I’m sharing this post on the Thought Provoking Thursday Link-up. Click here to read more posts shared there.

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Who Can Pray?

Psalm 1As we continue our conversation about prayer, let’s consider the question, “Who can pray?” Anybody can pray! We just might not all get the desired response. Let’s take a step back and think about this.

Some people say God only hears the prayers of Christians. They get this idea from Bible verses that talk about God only hearing the prayers of the righteous. (Proverbs 15:29, Proverbs 28:9, Isaiah 1:15 are examples). In fact, David said that if he had cherished sin in his heart, God wouldn’t have heard his prayer (Psalm 66:18-20). These verses are true as presented in their context (the verses that surround them) or under the specified circumstances, but we run into trouble if we claim they present a hard and fast rule that God must obey all the time.

First of all, such a rule would give us the power to limit God. We don’t have that kind of power. We never will. God can hear anything He wants to hear. God can hear everything everyone on the planet is saying all at once. He may choose not to hear, or to ignore or disregard, some prayers, but He does so at His discretion, not ours.

Second, if God only heard the prayers of the saved, no one could be saved. God wants everyone to be saved (2 Peter 3:9), therefore, He hears the prayers of those yet-to-be-saved—especially when their hearts are turning to Him. He welcomes these prayers—maybe most of all! If someone is seeking Him, He hears and responds (Deuteronomy 4:29, 1 Chronicles 28:9, Jeremiah 29:13).

The Conversation BeginsHere’s a simple way to understand the idea of God not hearing some prayers:

Imagine your three-year-old has been on a rampage all day. You served him breakfast; he told you it was yucky and refused to eat. You served him lunch; he yelled, “Yucky! Yucky! Yucky! I want ice cream.” You served him dinner; he leaned over to his sister and said, “Mommy only makes yucky food.” To your frustration, she joined his game and dumped her food on the floor.

When the last mealtime battle of the day is over, your son comes to you all sweetness and sunshine. “Mommy, I love you. Will you bake me some cookies for dessert?”

You think: “I have had enough of this child for this day.” You say, “Guess what, Kiddo! It’s bedtime. Go get your pajamas on.” Another battle ensues, but you are not baking cookies. You don’t even respond to the request.

Admittedly, that’s a very simplistic, very human example. God is neither simplistic nor human. Yet, if someone is constantly calling him unfaithful, unable, or non-existent, encouraging others to do the same, He’s not going to pay attention to that person’s self-centered prayers. He will respond with loving discipline (note: loving discipline, never petty vengeance). He will continue to woo that person toward a loving and mature relationship with Him. He will not take away that person’s freedom to choose nor compromise what’s right to make a deal. He acts in accordance with His child’s behavior, teaching with the kind of patience mothers everywhere wish they had.

So anybody can pray. But God does not receive all prayers in the same way.

Let’s consider the flip side:

You and your three-year-old are enjoying a great day together. He eats the food you serve and asks for more. He even helps you feed his sister. Then he plays with her while you do the dishes. He folds washcloths and matches socks while you’re folding laundry. He cuddles close and listens attentively during story time. When he asks for cookies, you bake them joyfully. In fact, you make up your mind to bake him cookies before he even thinks to ask. Sharing cookies is the perfect end to this fantastic day.

Again, very simplistic, very human, but with a level of truth we can grasp. God created us to love and enjoy Him. When we do so by spending regular time with Him in prayer, He enjoys our company and enjoys answering our prayers—within the scope of His plans—for us, for others, for His Kingdom, for eternity.

  • Will He always give us the cookies if we’re living His way? No.
  • Does He only give us what we want if we’re living His way? No.

That’s not how the analogy works. (And for the record, if ever you think you’ve found a formula for getting God to give you what you want every time, you need to rethink it. You have thunk something wrong.)

God loves each person He has made and longs to enjoy a relationship with each one. He sees what we can’t, though, and answers our prayers according to His Will, for the good of His Kingdom and the glory of His name. Prayer is a conversation with Him about this relationship, about the business of His Kingdom. We pray to develop this relationship, to more deeply understand our loving God and His plans for us. That’s why anyone can pray; God wants relationship with everyone! But self-centered prayers with no regard for God are meaningless and likely to be ignored.

When we delight in God, He delights in us. Our prayers become more effective as the relationship grows. Anybody can pray. But if we want to be sure that God’s hearing our prayers, we have to want God.

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Just a Thought about Intercessory Prayer

Prayer Snippet

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The Conversation Begins

The Conversation Begins“Prayer is keeping company with God.” –Clement of Alexandria

Today I’m starting a new series on prayer. Once a week or so, I’m going to write to explore this practice with you. I’ve brainstormed enough ideas to write every day for a month, but blogging every day would keep me from doing other things I need to do every day, so I’ve decided to keep these to about once a week. For those of you who participate in October’s “31 Days of . . .” blogging event, think of this as “31 [or more] [non-consecutive] Days of . . . Prayer.” Between prayer posts, I’ll continue to write about other thoughts God puts on my heart.

Let’s start with the basics: What is prayer?

Prayer is simply a conversation with God. In fact, it is a conversation initiated by God in the beginning, in your beginning—when He created you.

Just imagine, before you were born, God was there, whispering to you, singing over you, inviting you into relationship with Him. Prayer is responding to this invitation, recognizing the Presence of the God Who Is with you always, and talking with Him . . . about anything . . . and everything . . . all the time.

It is a continual conversation.

I looked up this word, continual, when I chose to use it in the subtitle of my book, Parachute Prayer: the Practice of Praying Continually. 1 Thessalonians 5:17, my theme verse, says, “Pray continually.” I wondered why it didn’t say continuously and if it made a difference.

It does!

Continuously never pauses. We must breathe continuously or we die. Continually, though, stops, then starts, then stops, then goes on. This is prayer: an on-going (or continual) conversation with God about life.

My husband and I are currently engaged in an on-going conversation with each other about the process of adopting our daughter. We meet to give each other updates on tasks to complete, progress made, set-backs, hopes, dreams, discouragements, insights. We go our separate ways for a time—Mike to work, me to manage our home, write a book. Together we enjoy our other pursuits, pastimes, and people. Life goes on. Yet we come back to the adoption conversation again and again and again.

With God, though, we never go our separate ways. He is with us always! He is always available to listen and interested in continuing the conversation of life. Sometimes He pokes us, so to speak, letting us know we need to sit and talk. More often, He waits, patiently—faithfully, for us to initiate words with Him, for us to acknowledge His Presence, for us to seek His face, to learn to recognize His voice, to enjoy His company. Approaching Him is the beginning of prayer.

I look forward to exploring this conversation with you in following weeks. Already I’ve gained a new insight to write about soon. I pray God will give you new insights, too!

Father, thank You for inviting us to talk with You! You created us to know You, to love You, to enjoy You forever, and You made it possible for us to start right now! Teach us, Lord. We’ve so much to learn, and we love you so. Amen.


 

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