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When Can We Pray?

The Conversation BeginsTwo more W’s! That’s all I have. Two more questions starting with one of the five W’s and then we’re moving on in this series to explore as many different kinds of prayer as I can think of. (There are 23 on my list so far.) For fun, I invite you to brainstorm your own list, keep it to yourself for now, check off the kinds of prayer I write about each week, then let me know at the end if I missed anything, so I can add it to my list. I may even invite you to write a guest post about it!

Today, however, I want to talk about when. When can we pray? My short answer, of course, is anytime we want to talk to God. He’s always present. He never sleeps. He will hear our prayers whenever we want to talk to Him. One of my favorite Bible verses about prayer shows this: “But Jesus often slipped away to be alone so he could pray” (Luke 5:16, NCV) Whenever Jesus felt the need to talk with His Father, He made Himself scarce so He could. God invites us to do the same.

Though we are welcome and encouraged to talk with God anytime, setting aside a specific time for prayer each day, when possible, is a helpful discipline. What time of day is best for this? Whatever time works best!

I once read a book for women on disciplining every area of life. This book had some helpful tips, but I found myself arguing with the author often as I read. She seemed to believe that whatever worked for her would work for everyone, and so she presented her ideas as rules for all women to follow. When she got to the chapter on prayer, she wrote that everyone must pray first thing in the morning. To make her case, she cited several Bible passages in which people were praying in the morning. Unfortunately, she ignored all the Bible passages about people praying in the middle of the day, in the evening, all night long, and at other random times of day. Using her method, I could have made a case that the Bible says we all have to pray at just about any time of day I preferred.

We Get to Talk to GodBut that would have been a misuse of Scripture. The Bible doesn’t tell us when we have to pray. It simply tells us that we can and that God hears us and that we’re blessed when we do. Remember this: talking to God is something we get to do because He has invited us to. He loves us and He loves it when we want to talk with Him. If my kids or my husband only talked to me because they felt they had to, that they had some kind of duty or obligation to fulfill, my feelings would be hurt. Of course, if that were all I could get I would take it because I adore my family! But I wouldn’t feel we had a healthy relationship. And I would be right. I want the people I love to talk to me because they love me and want to share their lives with me! (And I am so thankful they do!)

God wants us to view prayer the same way. He wants us to love Him, respect Him, tell Him what’s going on in our world, seek His wisdom and help, and enjoy just getting to be in His Presence. King David says it best: One thing I ask from the Lordthis only do I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze on the beauty of the Lord and to seek him in his temple” (Psalm 27:4). Nothing gave that man more joy than to be in God’s Presence.

That said, I really do like to pray first thing in the morning. I love starting my day with God, and I encourage you to try it if you haven’t already. If you can’t form a complete sentence before noon, though, you might find another time of day more beneficial; that really is okay. I think there’s something to be said for bedtime prayers, ending the day with a conversation with God about all that went right and all that went wrong and all that we’re hoping for come the new day.

Then again, if you have lots of littles in your house, practicing a consistent prayer time may be an exercise in futility. Instead, keep a prayer journal and pen on hand, then watch for those rare moments when everyone is happy and occupied. Grab your journal and pen, sit down quietly, and pray while the moment lasts. Some may think this is just asking for chaos to ensue, but if you’re serious about finding a daily time to pray, ask God to give you these moments on occasion, then learn to make the most of them. Be thankful for however many He provides.

To summarize: we can pray anytime, anywhere, about anything. God is with us. He loves us, and He loves to hear us pray. Whenever we’re ready to talk with Him, God is ready to hear the words we’ll say.

Father, thank You for the privilege of prayer. Call us to it! Help us to choose a regular time for prayer and to develop a consistent routine. Then remind us to talk to You throughout the day. Prayer is how we share our lives with You, the One Who loves us like no one else can. We love You, too. Amen.


I’m sharing this post with the Thought-Provoking Thursday link-up. Click here to read more posts shared there.

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Who Can We Pray For?

The Conversation BeginsIf you’ve been following this series, you already know the answer to this question. We can pray for anyone whose name or face comes to mind. In fact, if their name or face comes to mind, we can get in the habit of considering it a call to prayer. If we’re aware that God’s Spirit is with us always and learn to pay attention to His prompts, He’ll call us to pray for others more often than you may think. I’ve written about this in Parachute Prayer: the Practice of Praying Continually. I invite you read that book to learn more about this discipline.*

Here are a few ideas for now:

  1. We can pray for God. Jesus did! In The Lord’s Prayer, He prayed that God’s kingdom would come and His will be done.  We can ask for this, too. Does God need our prayers in order for His purposes to be accomplished? Ultimately, I don’t think so. I suspect the prayer for God is really for our benefit and for the benefit of those around us. When we ask for God’s kingdom to come and His will be done, we’ll become more aware of ways we can participate. We’ll become more willing and eager to participate. God’s Spirit will work through us to draw others into the action, too.
  2. Who We Can Pray ForWe can pray for our families.
  3. We can pray for our friends.
  4. We can pray for ourselves.
  5. We can pray for our churches.
  6. We can pray for our communities.
  7. We can pray for people who serve our families and communities.
  8. We can pray for our nation.
  9. We can pray for our world.
  10. We can pray for strangers we encounter while out and about.
  11. We can pray about needs we see on the internet, in the paper, or on TV.

We can pray for specifics if we know them, but if we don’t and sense a reason to pray, we can pray generically. God knows what’s going on in other people’s lives even when we don’t. Going one step further, we don’t even have to wait until we sense that someone needs a prayer. If we’re sitting in the airport waiting to board a flight, we can talk to God about the fellow travelers who come into view. If someone treats us with unexpected kindness—or undeserved grumpiness—we can whisper a prayer for that person as we go on our way. One deserves a blessing; the other may need it desperately.

Father, please make us sensitive to Your Spirit’s call to pray—for anyone, anywhere. You know the whole world’s needs. Thank You for inviting us to participate as You work in our world. Thy Kingdom come, Lord. Amen.


*If you’re starting to think about Christmas, Parachute Prayer even has a section on praying through the holidays: Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year’s, and more. To order a copy from Amazon.com, click here.

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Where Can We Pray?

The Conversation BeginsJust in case you haven’t figured it out yet, I’m starting this 31+ non-consecutive-day prayer series by answering the five W’s and H: Who, What, Where, Why, When, and How—not necessarily in that order, of course. I can’t be too predictable. So far I’ve written about what prayer is and who can pray. I’ve also touched on why and how we pray because it all kind of goes together. That’s okay. Repetition reinforces learning no matter our age.

Today I want to look at the question, “Where can we pray?”

Anywhere!!! Prayer is communicating with God. God is everywhere. Therefore, we can pray anywhere.

We don’t have to wait until we go to church or kneel beside our beds or sit down for a meal. If you feel grateful for something God is doing in your life, thank Him where you are. If you see an accident on the highway, pray for the victims as you drive past the scene. If you receive an e-mail notice with a prayer request, pray over it as you read. This kind of praying is the topic of my book, Parachute Prayer. I invite you to read it for many more prayer prompts like these.

In the meantime, let me throw out a few more ideas regarding where we can pray. These are for when we’re craving times of deeper, more focused prayer:

  • My personal favorite place to pray is in my journal. When I pick up my pen and start writing in that book, it doesn’t matter where I’m seated physically—my mind is focused on God as I’m writing. This doesn’t work for everyone; God has wired us all a little bit differently when it comes to how we concentrate best. My journal just happens to work best for me.
  • Hiding in the closet is another favorite of mine. Until recently, I thought this was unique—maybe strange. It’s not. It’s actually a pretty common mom thing. For some inexplicable reason, a closed closet seems to be an effective kid-free zone. That makes it Mom’s Sacred Space. Maybe there’s just something more personal about talking to God while seated . . . or lying . . . or crying in a small, enclosed place. (Just be sure your kids know where to find you if they need you. We wouldn’t want them to think that you abandoned them.) If there’s no room for you in your closet, try the Susannah Wesley approach and pull your apron over your head. This amazing woman taught her kids to respect this signal that she was taking a time-out for prayer. The concept is the same.
  • One church in our community has developed a prayer trail—a place where people can go to pray as they walk the carefully maintained path. I also know of people who simply pray for their neighborhoods as they walk through them. Studies have proven that we think better when we’re in motion. I’ve experienced this as some of my favorite writing ideas have come to me during long runs. God’s Spirit can also use the opportunity we provide by walking to help us remember things for which we want to pray. I do think our intent matters, though. God may take our prayers less seriously if we’re thinking, “I’m running, so I may as well pray,” rather than if we deliberately go on a walk because we want to pray. Let me clarify just a bit. If I’m running, and God brings a prayer concern to mind, I can pray while I’m running. That’s a Parachute Prayer. It’s a good thing. God gets my attention, and I respond to Him. But if I know God is calling me to a more focused time of prayer and I say, “Sure, God. But how about letting me accomplish two things at once? Let’s talk while I run,” my need for real communion with God probably won’t be met. God will patiently wait until I choose to set my heart wholly on Him.
  • I also like to pray while I’m driving. Sometimes if I have a ways to go, I’ll turn off the radio and have a talk with God. If you choose to give this a try, please remember not to close your eyes. Keep them on the road. Turning off the radio demonstrates an intentional decision to set our hearts on God and pray.
  • One final idea: we can pray in bed in the middle of the night. Sometimes this one really is more of an “I’m awake, God, so I may as well pray” kind of thing. But I don’t think He minds under these circumstances. Sometimes He wakes us up to talk to Him, putting specific concerns in our hearts. Other times He listens to whatever we have to say then helps us fall back to sleep—not unlike a parent who helps a child who wakes in the night.

We really can pray anywhere! God loves it when we choose to set our minds and hearts on Him.

Where do you like to pray?

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Who Can Pray?

Psalm 1As we continue our conversation about prayer, let’s consider the question, “Who can pray?” Anybody can pray! We just might not all get the desired response. Let’s take a step back and think about this.

Some people say God only hears the prayers of Christians. They get this idea from Bible verses that talk about God only hearing the prayers of the righteous. (Proverbs 15:29, Proverbs 28:9, Isaiah 1:15 are examples). In fact, David said that if he had cherished sin in his heart, God wouldn’t have heard his prayer (Psalm 66:18-20). These verses are true as presented in their context (the verses that surround them) or under the specified circumstances, but we run into trouble if we claim they present a hard and fast rule that God must obey all the time.

First of all, such a rule would give us the power to limit God. We don’t have that kind of power. We never will. God can hear anything He wants to hear. God can hear everything everyone on the planet is saying all at once. He may choose not to hear, or to ignore or disregard, some prayers, but He does so at His discretion, not ours.

Second, if God only heard the prayers of the saved, no one could be saved. God wants everyone to be saved (2 Peter 3:9), therefore, He hears the prayers of those yet-to-be-saved—especially when their hearts are turning to Him. He welcomes these prayers—maybe most of all! If someone is seeking Him, He hears and responds (Deuteronomy 4:29, 1 Chronicles 28:9, Jeremiah 29:13).

The Conversation BeginsHere’s a simple way to understand the idea of God not hearing some prayers:

Imagine your three-year-old has been on a rampage all day. You served him breakfast; he told you it was yucky and refused to eat. You served him lunch; he yelled, “Yucky! Yucky! Yucky! I want ice cream.” You served him dinner; he leaned over to his sister and said, “Mommy only makes yucky food.” To your frustration, she joined his game and dumped her food on the floor.

When the last mealtime battle of the day is over, your son comes to you all sweetness and sunshine. “Mommy, I love you. Will you bake me some cookies for dessert?”

You think: “I have had enough of this child for this day.” You say, “Guess what, Kiddo! It’s bedtime. Go get your pajamas on.” Another battle ensues, but you are not baking cookies. You don’t even respond to the request.

Admittedly, that’s a very simplistic, very human example. God is neither simplistic nor human. Yet, if someone is constantly calling him unfaithful, unable, or non-existent, encouraging others to do the same, He’s not going to pay attention to that person’s self-centered prayers. He will respond with loving discipline (note: loving discipline, never petty vengeance). He will continue to woo that person toward a loving and mature relationship with Him. He will not take away that person’s freedom to choose nor compromise what’s right to make a deal. He acts in accordance with His child’s behavior, teaching with the kind of patience mothers everywhere wish they had.

So anybody can pray. But God does not receive all prayers in the same way.

Let’s consider the flip side:

You and your three-year-old are enjoying a great day together. He eats the food you serve and asks for more. He even helps you feed his sister. Then he plays with her while you do the dishes. He folds washcloths and matches socks while you’re folding laundry. He cuddles close and listens attentively during story time. When he asks for cookies, you bake them joyfully. In fact, you make up your mind to bake him cookies before he even thinks to ask. Sharing cookies is the perfect end to this fantastic day.

Again, very simplistic, very human, but with a level of truth we can grasp. God created us to love and enjoy Him. When we do so by spending regular time with Him in prayer, He enjoys our company and enjoys answering our prayers—within the scope of His plans—for us, for others, for His Kingdom, for eternity.

  • Will He always give us the cookies if we’re living His way? No.
  • Does He only give us what we want if we’re living His way? No.

That’s not how the analogy works. (And for the record, if ever you think you’ve found a formula for getting God to give you what you want every time, you need to rethink it. You have thunk something wrong.)

God loves each person He has made and longs to enjoy a relationship with each one. He sees what we can’t, though, and answers our prayers according to His Will, for the good of His Kingdom and the glory of His name. Prayer is a conversation with Him about this relationship, about the business of His Kingdom. We pray to develop this relationship, to more deeply understand our loving God and His plans for us. That’s why anyone can pray; God wants relationship with everyone! But self-centered prayers with no regard for God are meaningless and likely to be ignored.

When we delight in God, He delights in us. Our prayers become more effective as the relationship grows. Anybody can pray. But if we want to be sure that God’s hearing our prayers, we have to want God.

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The Conversation Begins

The Conversation Begins“Prayer is keeping company with God.” –Clement of Alexandria

Today I’m starting a new series on prayer. Once a week or so, I’m going to write to explore this practice with you. I’ve brainstormed enough ideas to write every day for a month, but blogging every day would keep me from doing other things I need to do every day, so I’ve decided to keep these to about once a week. For those of you who participate in October’s “31 Days of . . .” blogging event, think of this as “31 [or more] [non-consecutive] Days of . . . Prayer.” Between prayer posts, I’ll continue to write about other thoughts God puts on my heart.

Let’s start with the basics: What is prayer?

Prayer is simply a conversation with God. In fact, it is a conversation initiated by God in the beginning, in your beginning—when He created you.

Just imagine, before you were born, God was there, whispering to you, singing over you, inviting you into relationship with Him. Prayer is responding to this invitation, recognizing the Presence of the God Who Is with you always, and talking with Him . . . about anything . . . and everything . . . all the time.

It is a continual conversation.

I looked up this word, continual, when I chose to use it in the subtitle of my book, Parachute Prayer: the Practice of Praying Continually. 1 Thessalonians 5:17, my theme verse, says, “Pray continually.” I wondered why it didn’t say continuously and if it made a difference.

It does!

Continuously never pauses. We must breathe continuously or we die. Continually, though, stops, then starts, then stops, then goes on. This is prayer: an on-going (or continual) conversation with God about life.

My husband and I are currently engaged in an on-going conversation with each other about the process of adopting our daughter. We meet to give each other updates on tasks to complete, progress made, set-backs, hopes, dreams, discouragements, insights. We go our separate ways for a time—Mike to work, me to manage our home, write a book. Together we enjoy our other pursuits, pastimes, and people. Life goes on. Yet we come back to the adoption conversation again and again and again.

With God, though, we never go our separate ways. He is with us always! He is always available to listen and interested in continuing the conversation of life. Sometimes He pokes us, so to speak, letting us know we need to sit and talk. More often, He waits, patiently—faithfully, for us to initiate words with Him, for us to acknowledge His Presence, for us to seek His face, to learn to recognize His voice, to enjoy His company. Approaching Him is the beginning of prayer.

I look forward to exploring this conversation with you in following weeks. Already I’ve gained a new insight to write about soon. I pray God will give you new insights, too!

Father, thank You for inviting us to talk with You! You created us to know You, to love You, to enjoy You forever, and You made it possible for us to start right now! Teach us, Lord. We’ve so much to learn, and we love you so. Amen.


 

I’m sharing this post with A Little R & R Wednesdays. Click here to visit there!

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Jeremiah 29:11 in Context

Jeremiah 29-13“This is what the Lord says: ‘When seventy years are completed for Babylon, I will come to you and fulfill my good promise to bring you back to this place. For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.’” –Jeremiah 29:10-13

Jeremiah 29:11 is a favorite verse for many. I love claiming the promise that the Lord has good plans for me, plans to prosper and not harm, plans to give hope and a future. These words are comforting in times of trouble; they inspire confidence!

But we often take them out of context which means we miss part of their meaning. When we look at the surrounding verses, we discover this verse is more than a promise about what God is going to do. God reveals our part—something He was waiting for from the Israelites and, therefore, may be waiting for from us, too.

These verses are part of a letter from Jeremiah, in Jerusalem, to God’s people living in exile in Babylon. The Israelites had not been faithful to God, and so He allowed other nations to conquer and rule over them. But He set a time limit on this. He told the people their exile would end after seventy years. He told them of His good plans for them then. Finally, He told them that they would pray to Him, and He would listen to them. They would seek Him and find Him when they chose to seek Him with all their heart.

It seems to me that God may have been saying, “I know it’s going to take you seventy years to get to that point—the point where you finally put me first and seek me with all your heart. So I am now making good plans for you for then.” He doesn’t invite them to pray to Him now. He simply says the day will come when they will pray to Him. He doesn’t invite them to seek Him wholeheartedly now. He only says they’ll find Him when they do. God knew it was going to take His people some time, but He was prepared to bless them abundantly when they got around to getting their hearts right. And He knew when that would happen.

From our point of view, the lesson seems so simple. We seek God wholeheartedly; He puts His good plans for us into motion. Voila! But the Israelites didn’t learn how to seek Him wholeheartedly for seventy years. And I can’t say I’ve mastered it yet. In fact, wholehearted devotion probably takes a lifetime to develop.

A lifetime.

Seventy (or eighty or a hundred or more) years!

So what are we to do?

We can start practicing now. We can start by identifying distractions to better make seeking God the primary aim of every day. What are some things you are tempted to seek with your whole heart in place of God? My list includes books, family, control, health, perfection. Am I wrong to enjoy these and want them in my life? No. Reading, enjoying time with loved ones, keeping order (to an extent), staying as healthy as I can, and doing my best are all good things–gifts from God’s hand to appreciate. I just have to be sure that they aren’t keeping me from seeking God, from discovering what He wants me to do each day, from worshiping, praying, serving, or loving Him over all else. He’s given us a lifetime of learning to put Him first, letting everything else fall into its proper place under Him.

Am I saying we have to earn the right to enjoy God’s good plans? Not really. It’s more of a parent/child thing. Imagine that you have a toddler who wants to drive the car. You look forward to the day when he will be ready and able to drive the car. You want him to enjoy that privilege. But you know your toddler isn’t ready for that good thing just yet. In fact, as a sixteen-year-old, he may not be ready for that good thing just yet—if he hasn’t shown responsibility for his own actions, concern for others, or respect for authority. You have good plans for your child’s future, but you must wait for him to mature or disaster will be the result.

God knows when the time will be right for all of His plans for us to go into effect. He’s watching for the moment—wanting it for us as much as we want it ourselves. He has good plans for us—plans that will glorify His name. Let’s practice seeking Him wholeheartedly while we wait.

Father, thank You for the assurance of Your good plans for us. The best of these is that we will grow in our knowledge of You! Help us to seek You more each day, trusting You to let everything else fall into its proper place. We love You, Lord, and long to please You. Please teach us how. Amen.

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A Snippet from Luke 12

Snippet 1

 

Dear Readers, Friends, Family, People Who’ve Just Stumbled onto This Blog and Who are Just So Welcome to Do So—

I realize my posts this summer have been a little more scarce than usual. Sometimes life gets crazy and steals all the words away. That doesn’t mean I haven’t been thinking of you. I just had to give myself a bit of space through a busy, and sometimes emotional, summer break.

But now we’re all moved into our new home. We’re done travelling for a bit—a little bit. Our cantankerously sweet, little dog has travelled to his final resting place. (Sniffle. Tear up.) Our home-from-college son has returned to his studies. (Choke back tears and smile for his joy–which is our own. We miss them, but we’re so proud of our boys!) Now I’m ready to reclaim the order of my quiet, little world and write again!

I know, I know. Experts say that real writers write through chaos. That may be so for some. Me—I journal through chaos, process experiences, then write, really write, when everything settles down. That’s how I roll. I’m pretty sure I’m still real.

But I’m not really reclaiming the order of my quiet, little world. Instead I’m going to have to learn how to write through chaos. I raised three boys while writing my first book, so I’m sure it can be done. Stay with me as I get around to telling you what’s going on . . .

When my husband and I first became empty-nesters, I thought I’d have hours and hours and hours of time to write. (When the established empty-nesters stop laughing their silly heads off, I’ll continue . . . any time now . . . we’re waiting . . . okay, that’s enough!)

My first clue that those hours of time weren’t going to materialize came when our family scattered. Seriously, my immediate family, i.e. children, parents, siblings, are a whole new diaspora, currently dwelling in seven states, covering three, almost four, corners of the US. This may not be as unusual as I think. But there just aren’t enough hours to spend with them all, so when we find time we visit because we love our people!!! And we savor every moment with them.

Which brings me to the new reason those hours of time aren’t going to materialize:

Soon, we hope and pray, we’ll have another person to savor moments with!

Yesterday we turned in our applications and other paperwork in order to adopt. That means we’re officially expecting another child now! An older child; not a baby. A daughter! And I’m just as nervous about making this announcement as I was about announcing the expected arrival of our biological children. I know a lot will be different, but I’m amazed at how much is the same.

  • We can’t even begin to imagine what life with this new person will be like.
  • We know she’ll turn our lives upside-down.
  • We know we’ll cherish her no matter what because love is a choice and family is precious and each child is a hand-picked gift from God.
  • We cannot wait!

We’ve wanted to do this for a long time. We actually started the process back in Colorado in 2005. But God slammed all the doors shut back then. He knew there was a storm coming, that our energy was needed elsewhere, that maybe we weren’t as ready for this new adventure as we thought we were. We thought those doors were closed forever, but . . .

Now, we feel as if we’re waking up and finding ourselves in the waiting room we didn’t even realize we were still in. We’re noticing that the doors are all wide open now, and we’re peeking through with anticipation, almost disbelief. Can this be real? After all this time, we can proceed and prepare to bring our daughter home!

Of course, we’ve only just started the process, so we’re still in the waiting room. But soon, hopefully very soon, we’ll have a new child! Please keep our family in your prayers.

Sometimes when we’re watchful and ready, it seems the doors will never open, the Master will never come. But how amazing it will always be when He finally does, whether He’s bringing the answer to a prayer, fulfilling a dream, assigning a task, or taking us home.

Father, thank You for sweet surprises. Please keep us watchful and alert, ready to act. Show us Your way—in Your time. Amen.

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Questions to Ask When People Bring Hurt

1 Peter 3-8n9“Finally, all of you, be like-minded, be sympathetic, love one another, be compassionate and humble. Do not repay evil with evil or insult with insult. On the contrary, repay evil with blessing, because to this you were called so that you may inherit a blessing.”1 Peter 3:8-9

If only everyone would follow Peter’s instructions found in these verses, our world would be a happier place. Just imagine if everyone tried to see the other’s point of view, to be sympathetic, to love, to show compassion, and to act with humility in all situations.

Sadly, not every does. In fact, everyone doesn’t—at least not in every situation all the time. This may be why Peter devoted one sentence to how to conduct ourselves positively and two to what to do when others don’t. In this world, we will encounter evil and insults. We need to know how to respond.

Here are three things to ask when deciding how to repay evil with a blessing:

1. If Jesus were in this situation, how would He handle it? When we don’t know the answer, we can study to gospels and ask God’s Spirit for help. The better we know Jesus and His way, the more naturally we’ll follow in every circumstance.

2. What might God be trying to accomplish in this other person’s life? Depending on how well we know this person, the answer may be obvious or hard to determine. Either way, we can take what we know to God as we talk with Him about the situation and pray for the other person.

3. How might God be able to use our response to this event? Asking this question takes the focus off ourselves and our personal injuries. We can trust God to help us and to heal us regardless of what the other person does or has done. Therefore, we are free to pray for the one who hurt us, to seek that person’s good.

When we repay evil with such a blessing, we enjoy personal peace, we help to bring healing to the situation, we offer good to the one who hurt us, and we send a message to the world. All of these honor God because as Christians, we are being watched every day. Unbelievers want to see, to test, how we handle life. Our reactions to evil and to insults teach them about Jesus Christ.

Father, that’s a sobering thought. When someone hurts me, my response can’t be all about me. But, thanks to Jesus, it doesn’t have to be. I can trust You to take care of me. Help me to offer blessings to others to encourage the world to seek You and to do good. In Jesus’ name, amen.

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The Find-a-Penny Prayer

“Find a penny. Pick it up. All the day you’ll have good luck.”

I found a penny on the ground by my truck yesterday. I wasn’t even tempted to pick it up. I live in Texas now. It’s hot. That penny would have burned my fingers. But seeing it made me smile. I remember how exciting it was, as a child, to find a penny on the ground.

Find a Penny PrayerThough I didn’t claim yesterday’s penny, a new value for found pennies occurred to me. When we see pennies on the ground, let’s pray for the people who dropped them. The lost penny may not have caused great financial hardship (unless they’d been desperate for a cup of coffee, searched their car for change, found exactly the right amount needed, then dropped that one penny . . . these things do happen). But we can ask God to bless them financially, help them manage their money wisely, or even just to do something that will brighten their day.

Then, if we don’t pick up the penny ourselves, we can pray for the person who will! I’m picturing a child, but I also remember a pastor who used found pennies as a sermon illustration and explained why he always picks them up. (I don’t remember why, though, just that he always does. I’m guessing I didn’t remember what he’d hoped I would.)

Regardless, let’s let found pennies remind us to pray for those who dropped them and those who will pick them up. A conversation with Jesus is better than hoping for luck.


You know, I have to admit that some of the prayer prompts I come up with, like this one, sometimes seem a little silly at first. But I love discovering that something as simple as a penny on the ground can remind me to talk to God on another person’s behalf and that, as I talk to Him for that person, His Spirit immediately reminds me of other things to talk to Him about. As quick as that, I’m praying as I go about the random business of my day. And maybe that person who dropped a penny really needs to be remembered in prayer. Or maybe that prayer will remind me to pray for someone else’s known need that I forgotten to talk over with God. Or maybe God just wants to get my attention—for us to spend some time together in the middle of a busy day. I can’t look at anything that reminds me to talk to God as silly when I consider it that way. May everything around us come to remind us to pray.

Father, thank You for drawing my attention to a shiny penny on hot pavement. Thank You for reminding me to pray. Please help us all remember to “pray continually” (1 Thessalonians 5:17). We love You. We love meeting with You—anytime of day. Amen.

For more prayer prompts, read my book, Parachute Prayer: The Practice of Praying Continually. Available for Kindle at Amazon.com or in paperback through several on-line bookstores.

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That the Fully Committed Will Stay Strong

Parachute Prayer Post“And may your hearts be fully committed to the Lord our God, to live by his decrees and obey his commands, as at this time.” -1 Kings 8:61

After Solomon built and dedicated God’s Temple, he spoke to the people. 1 Kings 8:61 records some of his words. When I read the first phrase of this verse, I started to pray for people I know who aren’t fully committed to the Lord. But then I read the last phrase. Solomon wasn’t urging the people to become committed to the Lord; he wanted them to stay that way. That little phrase, as at this time, reminded me, once again, that while it’s important to pray for the one lost sheep to be found (Luke 15:1-7), it’s also important to pray for the 99 who are safely in the fold.

And Solomon’s own life proves this. Just three chapters later, we read of Solomon’s downfall and death. This king who urged God’s people to remain faithful did not. Tragically, his choices set a series of events in motion that led the whole nation to fall. Likewise, when strong Christians falter, they tend to take others down with them. 1 Peter 5:8 says, “Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.” When our enemy gets hold of someone influential, he’s especially thrilled. It’s his opportunity to take a whole herd. For everyone’s sake, we must pray that those who are committed to God will find the strength in Him to stay that way.

Because Solomon was a king and because Christians are God’s “chosen people, a royal priesthood” (1 Peter 2:9), let’s let symbols of royalty be our prompt to pray. When we see crowns, thrones, scepters, news of one royal family or another, let’s ask God to strengthen those who are fully committed to Him. May their hearts remain that way for their good, for the good of God’s Kingdom, and for God’s glory. Amen.


For more prayer prompts, read Parachute Prayer: The Practice of Praying Continually. Available in paperback or for Kindle.